The Most Popular Wedding Readings for Modern Ceremonies

Finding some suitable words to say (or have said) when you tie the knot is going to be a big part of your planning – the time consuming bit is finding the right wedding readings that are going to say just what you want.

woman performing a wedding reading The Most Popular Wedding Readings for Modern CeremoniesCredit: Dominique Bader

The Most Popular Wedding Readings for Modern Ceremonies

There are always some perennial favourites at weddings; words that have stood the test of time, that always seem right for the occasion, never date and raise smiles (and possibly provoke a few tears). You want your wedding reading to move you and your guests in all the right ways.

You’ll also have to make your wedding reading suitable for the location of your marriage ceremony. Remember, if you’re having a religious ceremony you can have a religious reading – from the Bible, for example. However if you’re having a civil ceremony, then religion/God cannot be mentioned whatsoever so you’re going to have to think creatively.

Woman giving a wedding reading The Most Popular Wedding Readings for Modern CeremoniesPhotography: Dasha Caffrey

Readings Suitable for a Church Ceremony

Song of Solomon, Chapter 2, verses 10-13; Chapter 8, verses 6&7

My beloved spoke and said to me,
    “Arise, my darling,
    my beautiful one, come with me.
See! The winter is past;
    the rains are over and gone.
Flowers appear on the earth;
    the season of singing has come,
the cooing of doves
    is heard in our land.
The fig tree forms its early fruit;
    the blossoming vines spread their fragrance.
Arise, come, my darling;
    my beautiful one, come with me.”

bride crying at wedding with guests The Most Popular Wedding Readings for Modern CeremoniesCredit: Albert Palmer Photography

1 Corinthians 13

These words from Corinthians are the most popular reading ever given at a church ceremony. It implies that if you live without love, you really have nothing. (We’d agree with that!)

If I speak in the tongues of men or of angels, but do not have love, I am only a resounding gong or a clanging cymbal.  If I have the gift of prophecy and can fathom all mysteries and all knowledge, and if I have a faith that can move mountains, but do not have love, I am nothing. If I give all I possess to the poor and give over my body to hardship that I may boast, but do not have love, I gain nothing.

Love is patient, love is kind. It does not envy, it does not boast, it is not proud. It does not dishonor others, it is not self-seeking, it is not easily angered, it keeps no record of wrongs. Love does not delight in evil but rejoices with the truth. It always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres.

Love never fails. But where there are prophecies, they will cease; where there are tongues, they will be stilled; where there is knowledge, it will pass away. For we know in part and we prophesy in part,  but when completeness comes, what is in part disappears. When I was a child, I talked like a child, I thought like a child, I reasoned like a child. When I became a man, I put the ways of childhood behind me. For now we see only a reflection as in a mirror; then we shall see face to face. Now I know in part; then I shall know fully, even as I am fully known.
And now these three remain: faith, hope and love. But the greatest of these is love.

Bride and groom at wedding ceremony The Most Popular Wedding Readings for Modern CeremoniesCredit: Eleanor Jane Weddings

‘Thoughts on Marriage’ by Kahlil Gibran

Of course you don’t have to have a religious reading even if you’re having a religious ceremony[1]. These thought-provoking lines from Kahil Gibran are often heard at weddings, because they seem to say all the right things when you are embarking on a life together.

“You were born together, and together you shall be forever more.
You shall be together when the white wings of death scatter your days.
Yes, you shall be together even in the silent memory of God.
But let there be spaces in your togetherness.
And let the winds of heaven dance between you.
Love one another, but make not a bond of love.
Let it rather be a moving sea between the shores of your souls.
Fill each other’s cup but drink not from one cup.
Give one another of your bread but eat not from the same loaf.
Sing and dance together and be joyous, but each one of you be
alone – even as the strings of a lute are alone though they quiver with the same music.
Give your hearts, but not in each other’s keeping.
For only the hand of Life can contain your hearts.
And stand together yet not too near together:
For the pillars of the temple stand apart,
And the oak tree and the Cyprus grow not in each other’s shadows”

Readings for a Civil Ceremony

“Registry office ceremonies and civil weddings, which are often less formal than the traditional Church ceremony, lend themselves well to ‘lighter’ readings,” says Lawrence Bernstein from Great Speech Writing[2]. “These are often more fun, certainly more light-hearted and provoke laughter from the guests.”

Some popular readings to consider include these two romantic passages. The first is especially wonderful if you’ve been together for a while already, talking when the first passions of love subside making way for a deeper emotion; the second is about the two of you joining together as a couple, and never being lonely again.

From Captain Corelli’s Mandolin by Louis de Bernières

“Love is a temporary madness. It erupts like an earthquake and then subsides.
And when it subsides you have to make a decision. You have to work out whether your roots have become so entwined together that it is inconceivable that you should ever part. Because this is what love is. Love is not breathlessness, it is not excitement, it is not the promulgation of promises of eternal passion. That is just being in love which any of us can convince ourselves we are. Love itself is what is left over when being in love has burned away, and this is both an art and a fortunate accident. Your mother and I had it, we had roots that grew towards each other underground, and when all the pretty blossom had fallen from our branches we found that we were one tree and not two.”

Apache Wedding Prayer

Commonly recited at weddings in the United States, this poem is on modern non-native origin, written in 1947 by Elliott Arnold.

“Now you will feel no rain,
For each of you will be shelter to the other.
Now you will feel no cold,
For each of you will be warmth to the other.
Now there is no more loneliness,
For each of you will be companion to the other.
Now you are two bodies,
But there is one life before you.
Go now to your dwelling place,
To enter into the days of your togetherness.
And may your days be good and long upon the earth.”

These readings are all popular with good reason – whatever the style of your ceremony, you’ll feel that you’re creating a thoughtful but loving mood when the most serious part of your wedding is taking place.

Read More:

References

  1. ^ Get more inspiration for your ceremony here (www.weddingideasmag.com)
  2. ^ How to deliver a medal-winning wedding speech! (www.weddingideasmag.com)

Thoughtful Wedding Readings for Your big day

From lighthearted to romantic and maybe even serious, choose from our favourite wedding readings that reflect your type of ceremony and who you are as a couple.

bride and groom exchanging vows Thoughtful Wedding Readings For Your Big Day

Thoughtful Wedding Readings for Your big day

Depending on if you’re having a religious or civil ceremony, your choice of readings can differ slightly. If you’re having a civil ceremony then any readings you choose will need to be non-religious. But don’t worry, that leaves you plenty of scope for finding something different and unique.

‘My True Love’ was written by Elizabethan poet Sir Phillip Sydney over 400 years ago. It may be old, but the words still ring true today, and it’s a lovely piece if you want to have something traditional and classical.

‘My True Love’ by Sir Phillip Sydney

My true love hath my heart and I have his,
By just exchange one for another given,
I hold his dear, and mine he cannot miss,
There never was a better bargain driven,
My true love hath my heart and I have his. 

His heart in me keeps him and me in one,
My heart in him his thoughts and senses guides,
He loves my heart, for once it was his own,
I cherish his because in me it bides,
My true love hath my heart and I have his.

We like this next poem because it explains just how a marriage should work. It’s more modern than ‘My True Love’, but it says it all perfectly.

Why Marriage? by Mari Nichols-Haining

Because to the depths of me, I long to love one person,
With all my heart, my soul, my mind, my body…

Because I need a forever friend to trust with the intimacies of me,
Who won’t hold them against me,
Who loves me when I’m unlikable,
Who sees the small child in me, and
Who looks for the divine potential of me…

Because I need to cuddle in the warmth of the night,
With someone I feel blessed to hold…

Because marriage means opportunity,
To grow in love in friendship…

Because marriage is a discipline,
To be added to a list of achievements…

Because marriages do not fail, people fail,
When they enter into marriage,
Expecting another to make them whole…

Because, knowing this,
I promise myself to take full responsibility,
For my spiritual, mental and physical wholeness,
I create me,
I take half of the responsibility for my marriage,
Together we create our marriage…

Because with this understanding,
The possibilities are limitless.

The author of ‘Dove Poem’ is unknown, but these words create a wonderful image of two birds joined together for the rest of their lives in peace and harmony. If you’re planning on releasing doves during your ceremony then this reading will be very appropriate.

‘Dove Poem’ by unknown author

Two doves meeting in the sky,
Two loves hand in hand eye to eye,
Two parts of a loving whole,
Two hearts and a single soul.

Two stars shining big and bright,
Two fires bringing warmth and light,
Two songs played in perfect tune,
Two flowers growing into bloom.

Two Doves gliding in the air,
Two loves free without a care,
Two parts of a loving whole,
Two hearts and a single soul.

Wedding guest performing reading Thoughtful Wedding Readings for Your big DayCredit: Ian Whitington

The words below are supposed to have been part of a blessing at a North American Apache tribe marriage ceremony. We love the idea that the two of you are a shelter for one another during life’s storms.

An Apache marriage reading

Now you will feel no rain, for each of you will be the shelter for each other. Now you will feel no cold, for each of you will be the warmth for the other. Now you are two persons, but there is only one life before. Go now to your dwelling place to enter into the days of your life together. And may your days be good and long upon the earth.

Treat yourselves and each other with respect, and remind yourselves often of what brought you together. Give the highest priority to the tenderness, gentleness and kindness that your connection deserves. When frustration, difficulty and fear assail your relationship – as they threaten all relationships at one time or another – remember to focus on what is right between you, not only the part which seems wrong. In this way, you can ride out the storms when clouds hide the face of the sun in your lives – remembering that even if you lose sight of it for a moment, the sun is still there. And if each of you takes responsibility for the quality of your life together, it will be marked by abundance and delight.

Wedding guest gives reading in church Thoughtful Wedding Readings for Your big DayCredit: Emma Lucy Photography

These wise words from writer and poet Kahlil Gibran cover why you should retain your own personalities through marriage. After all, isn’t that what first attracted you to one another in the first place?

‘On Marriage’ by Kahlil Gibran

You were born together, and together you shall be forevermore.
You shall be together when the white wings of death scatter your days.
Ay, you shall be together even in the silent memory of God.
But let there be spaces in your togetherness,
And let the winds of heavens dance between you.

Love one another, but make not a bond of love:
Let it rather be a moving sea between the shores of your souls.
Fill each other’s cup but drink not from one cup.
Give one another of your bread but eat not from the same loaf.
Sing and dance together and be joyous, but let each one of you be alone,
Even as the strings of a lute are alone though they quiver with the same music.

Give your hearts, but not into each other’s keeping.
For only the hand of Life can contain your hearts.
And stand together yet not too near together:
For the pillars of the temple stand apart,
And the oak tree and the cypress grow not in each other’s shadow.

1 Corinthians 13 reading Thoughtful Wedding Readings for Your big Day

If you’re having a religious ceremony then The Gift of Love from 1 Corinthians 13 is the perfect reading for your big day. This reading talks about the patience and kindness of love, it also speaks volumes about the sanctity of marriage. It’s no wonder it’s one of the most popular wedding readings that couples pick for their church weddings.

The Gift of Love – 1 Corinthians 13

If I speak in the tongues of mortals and of angels, but do not have love, I am a noisy gong or a clanging cymbal. And if I have prophetic powers, and understand all mysteries and all knowledge, and if I have all faith, so as to remove mountains, but do not have love, I am nothing. If I give away all my possessions, and if I hand over my body so that I may boast, but do not have love, I gain nothing.

Love is patient; love is kind; love is not envious or boastful or arrogant or rude. It does not insist on its own way; it is not irritable or resentful; it does not rejoice in wrongdoing, but rejoices in the truth. It bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things.

Love never ends. But as for prophecies, they will come to an end; as for tongues, they will cease; as for knowledge, it will come to an end. For we know only in part, and we prophesy only in part; but when the complete comes, the partial will come to an end.

When I was a child, I spoke like a child, I thought like a child, I reasoned like a child; when I became an adult, I put an end to childish ways. For now we see in a mirror, dimly, but then we will see face to face. Now I know only in part; then I will know fully, even as I have been fully known. And now faith, hope, and love abide, these three; and the greatest of these is love.

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Alternative Wedding Readings and Poems

Looking for romantic wedding readings that will shed a few tears? Or maybe a funny wedding poem that will have your guests roaring with laughter? Here are five ceremony reading ideas to get you started…

5 Alternative Wedding Readings and Poems

Most people think that a reading should be something from the Bible (although only if you’re having a religious ceremony) or perhaps some lines from a favourite poem, but really, a reading can be far much more than this.

Alternative Wedding Readings and Poems

L-O-V-E by Nat King Cole

How about reading a few lines from a meaningful song? We think the lyrics in L-O-V-E, sung by Nat King Cole, are a wonderfully romantic choice.

L is for the way you look at me
O is for the only one I see
V is very, very extraordinary
E is even more than anyone that you adore and 

Love is all that I can give to you
Love is more than just a game for two
Two in love can make it
Take my heart and please don’t break it
Love was made for me and you 

L is for the way you look at me
O is for the only one I see
V is very, very extraordinary
E is even more than anyone that you adore and 

Love is all that I can give to you
Love is more than just a game for two
Two in love can make it
Take my heart and please don’t break it
Love was made for me and you 

Love was made for me and you
Love was made for me and you

When Harry Met Sally proposal

You could also read some lines from a film that you both love, and who better to write your script that the legendary Nora Ephron in When Harry Met Sally? Adapt it to talk about what you love about your partner to make it even more personal.

“I love that you get cold when it’s 71 degrees out. I love that it takes you an hour and a half to order a sandwich. I love that you get a little crinkle above your nose when you’re looking at me like I’m nuts. I love that after I spend the day with you, I can still smell your perfume on my clothes. And I love that you are the last person I want to talk to before I go to sleep at night. And it’s not because I’m lonely, and it’s not because it’s New Year’s Eve. I came here tonight because when you realise you want to spend the rest of your life with somebody, you want the rest of your life to start as soon as possible.”

Love’s Philosophy by Percy Bysshe Shelly

If you still want a classic poem, Love’s Philosophy by the romantic Victorian poet Percy Bysshe Shelley is hard to beat.

The fountains mingle with the river,
And the rivers with the ocean;
The winds of heaven mix forever,
With a sweet emotion;
Nothing in the world is single;
All things by a law divine
In one another’s being mingle;
Why not I with thine?

The Runaway Bride

It’s not just the men who make the romantic proposals either. Here’s what Julia Roberts’ character had to say in The Runaway Bride.

“I guarantee that we’ll have tough times. And I guarantee that at some point, one or both of us will want to get out. But I also guarantee that if I don’t ask you to be mine, I’ll regret it for the rest of my life. Because I know in my heart you are the only one for me.”

alternative wedding readings hannahwhomes

Gift From The Sea by Anne Morrow Lindbergh

You might also like these thoughts on marriage from this piece about love from the popular book Gift From The Sea.

“When you love someone, you do not love them all the time, in exactly the same way, from moment to moment. It is an impossibility. It is even a lie to pretend to. And yet this is exactly what most of us demand.

We have so little faith in the ebb and flow of life, of love, of relationships. We leap at the flow of the tide and resist in terror its ebb. We are afraid it will never return. We insist on permanency, on duration, on continuity; when the only continuity possible, in life as in love, is in growth, in fluidity – in freedom, in the sense that the dancers are free, barely touching as they pass, but partners in the same pattern. 

The only real security is not in owning or possessing, not in demanding or expecting, not in hoping, even. Security in a relationship lies neither in looking back to what was in nostalgia, nor forward to what it might be in dread or anticipation, but living in the present relationship and accepting it as it is now.

Relationships must be like islands, one must accept them for what they are here and now, within their limits – islands, surrounded and interrupted by the sea, and continually visited and abandoned by the tides.”

READ MORE: 

Wedding Speech Guide: The Traditional Running Order of Wedding Speeches [1]

Groom Speech Jokes: How to Make Your Groom Speech Funny[2]

How to Write the Perfect Mother of the Bride Speech[3]


Want more wedding information and inspiration? Just hit ‘Like’ on our Wedding Ideas Facebook page[4], and ‘Follow’ on our @wimagazine Twitter account[5] to join in the conversation.


Bring Some fun Into Your day With These Quirky Wedding Readings

If you and your partner aren’t ones for tradition and are looking to inject a bit of fun into your wedding reception, why not use one of these quirky wedding readings. These quirky readings say all the right things but in a unique way, perfect for creative couples.

Bride giving speech - Bring Some fun Into Your day With These Quirky Wedding ReadingsCredit: chrisbarberphotography.co.uk

Bring Some fun Into Your day With These Quirky Wedding Readings

There are plenty of poems and excerpts from thousands of books that talk about love, companionship, compromise and all the other aspects of marriage. But if you and your groom want something a little bit different to set your speech[1] apart from the crowd, these unconventional readings may be perfect!

A Lovely Love Story by Edward Monkton

The fierce Dinosaur was trapped inside his cage of ice. Although it was cold he was happy in there. It was, after all, HIS cage.

Then along came the Lovely Other Dinosaur.

The Lovely Other Dinosaur melted the Dinosaur’s cage with kind words and loving thoughts.

I like this Dinosaur, thought the Lovely Other Dinosaur. Although he is fierce he is also tender and he is funny. He is also quite clever though I will not tell him this for now.

I like this Lovely Other Dinosaur, thought the Dinosaur. She is beautiful and she is different and she smells so nice. She is also a free spirit, which is a quality I much admire in a dinosaur.

But he can be so distant and so peculiar at times, thought the Lovely Other Dinosaur.

He is also overly fond of Things. Are all Dinosaurs so overly fond of Things?

But her mind skips from here to there so quickly, thought the Dinosaur. She is also uncommonly keen on Shopping. Are all Lovely Other Dinosaurs so uncommonly keen on shopping?

I will forgive his peculiarity and his concern for things, thought the Lovely Other Dinosaur. For they are part of what makes him a richly charactered individual.

I will forgive her skipping mind and her fondness for shopping, thought the Dinosaur. For she fills our life with beautiful thought and wonderful surprises. Besides, I am not unkeen on shopping either.

Now the Dinosaur and the Lovely Other Dinosaur are old. Look at them.

Together they stand on the hill telling each other stories and feeling the warmth of the sun on their backs.

And that, my friends, is how it is with love. Let us all be Dinosaurs and Lovely Other Dinosaurs together.

For the sun is warm. And the world is a beautiful place…

Lady reading - Bring Some fun Into Your day With These Quirky Wedding Readings

If you’re looking for a quirky poem to read aloud, then this one by John Cooper Clarke says it all.

I Wanna Be Yours by John Cooper Clarke

I wanna be your vacuum cleaner
breathing in your dust
I wanna be your Ford Cortina
I will never rust
If you like your coffee hot
let me be your coffee pot
You call the shots
I wanna be yours
I wanna be your raincoat
for those frequent rainy days
I wanna be your dreamboat
when you want to sail away
Let me be your teddy bear
take me with you anywhere
I don’t care
I wanna be yours
I wanna be your electric meter
I will not run out
I wanna be the electric heater
you’ll get cold without
I wanna be your setting lotion
hold your hair in deep devotion
Deep as the deep Atlantic ocean
that’s how deep is my devotion

That poem[2] is likely to raise a few laughs, so whoever is reciting it needs to pause for the giggles and then continue – take the words slowly and enjoy the entertainment it gives everybody!

Child reading - Bring Some fun Into Your day With These Quirky Wedding ReadingsCredit: mikiphotography.co.uk

We think it’s wonderful if a pageboy or young bridesmaid gives a reading. The rule here is to keep it short and sweet. They get their moment in the spotlight but don’t have time to feel overwhelmed. They’ll also need to practise quite a bit beforehand and make sure you’ve chosen a child who isn’t likely to get stage fright at the last minute and refuse to speak. You’re looking for a confident type.

Remember the rule above of waiting for laughs and ask your young reader to stay in place for a few seconds afterwards to wait for the applause (which is sure to follow). This poem Some Things Go Together is a perfect short reading that’s quirky but thought-provoking too!

Some Things Go Together by Charlotte Zolotow

Pairs of things that go together.
Pigeons with park
Stars with dark
Sand with sea
and you with me.
… Hats with heads
Pillows with beds
Sky with blue
and me with you.

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Want more wedding information and inspiration? Just hit ‘Like’ on our Wedding Ideas Facebook page, and ‘Follow’ on our @wimagazine Twitter account. To join in the conversation, share your stories here.[3][4][5]

References

  1. ^ speech (www.weddingideasmag.com)
  2. ^ poem (www.weddingideasmag.com)
  3. ^ Wedding Ideas Facebook page (www.facebook.com)
  4. ^ @wimagazine Twitter account. (twitter.com)
  5. ^ here (www.facebook.com)

Make Your Guests Laugh With These Funny Wedding Readings

It can be hard to write a speech that gets everyone laughing without recycling over-used puns and one-liners. Why not take some inspiration from these five funny wedding readings when you’re planning what to say.

Guests Laughing- Make Your Guests Laugh With These Funny Wedding Readings

Make Your Guests Laugh With These Funny Wedding Readings

If you’re not one for a tear-jerker and want to get your guests laughing, why not use these readings as a guide. They all sum up love and marriage in their own original way with an amusing twist.

“Yes I’ll Marry you my Dear” by Pam Ayres

Yes, I’ll marry you, my dear,
And here’s the reason why;
So I can push you out of bed
When the baby starts to cry,
And if we hear a knocking
And it’s creepy and it’s late,
I hand you the torch you see,
And you investigate.
Yes I’ll marry you, my dear,
You may not apprehend it,
But when the tumble-drier goes
It’s you that has to mend it,
You have to face the neighbour
Should our labrador attack him,
And if a drunkard fondles me
It’s you that has to whack him.
Yes, I’ll marry you,
You’re virile and you’re lean,
My house is like a pigsty
You can help to keep it clean.
That sexy little dinner
Which you served by candlelight,
As I do chipolatas,
You can cook it every night!
It’s you who has to work the drill and put up curtain track,
And when I’ve got PMT it’s you who gets the flak,
I do see great advantages,
But none of them for you,
And so before you see the light,
I do, I do, I do

Ladies giving wedding speech - Make Your Guests Laugh With These Funny Wedding Readings If you’re nervous about giving a reading[1], remember to keep it short and occasionally pause for laughs. Don’t talk through the laugh – enjoy entertaining everybody and let them enjoy it too. Here’s one we think will strike a few funny chords with the audience.

“Let me put it This way” by Simon Armitage

Let me put it this way: if you came to lay your sleeping head against my arm or sleeve, and if my arm went dead, or if I had to take my leave at midnight, I should rather cleave it from the joint or seam than make a scene or bring you round. There, how does that sound?

If you want a short reading to make up part of your speech or to add a closing comment, then this one by Sandra Boynton works perfectly. It talks about a future together, side by side.

“Your Personal Penguin” by Sandra Boynton

I like you a lot.
You’re funny and kind.
So let me explain
What I have in mind.
I want to be your personal penguin.
I want to walk right by your side.
I want to be your personal penguin.
I want to travel with you far and wide.

The late poet, Hovis Presley says it all really with this sweet poem. This is sure to bring a laugh from all age groups!

“I Rely on you” by Hovis Presley

I rely on you like a Skoda needs suspension, like the aged need a pension, like a trampoline needs tension, like a bungee jump needs apprehension. I rely on you like a camera needs a shutter, like a gambler needs a flutter, like a golfer needs a putter, like a buttered scone involves some butter. I rely on you like an acrobat needs ice cool nerve, like a hairpin needs a drastic curve, like an HGV needs endless derv, like an outside left needs a body swerve. I rely on you like a handyman needs pliers, like an auctioneer needs buyers, like a laundromat needs driers, like The Good Life needed Richard Briers. I rely on you like a water vole needs water, like a brick outhouse needs mortar, like a lemming to the slaughter, Ryan’s just Ryan without his daughter. I rely on you.

Wedding Party Laughing - Make Your Guests Laugh With These Funny Wedding ReadingsCredit: mikiphotography.co.uk

Sometimes you can inject some humour while saying something very serious. When you’re getting married, it’s sometimes called ‘taking the plunge’. This reading[2] below does just that. This one might be apt if you’ve known one another a long time before tying the knot.

“The Little Yellow Leaf” by Carin Berger

(The story of a leaf who isn’t ready to let go from the tree.)

And then, high up on an icy branch, a scarlet flash.
One more leaf holding tight.
“You’re here?” called the Little Yellow Leaf.
“I am,” said the Little Scarlet Leaf.
“Like me!” said the Little Yellow Leaf.
Neither spoke.
Finally…
“Will you?” asked the Little Scarlett Leaf.
“I will!” said the Little Yellow Leaf.
And one, two, three, they let go and soared.

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Want more wedding information and inspiration? Just hit ‘Like’ on our Wedding Ideas Facebook page[3], and ‘Follow’ on our @wimagazine Twitter account[4] to join in the conversation.

References

  1. ^ reading (www.weddingideasmag.com)
  2. ^ reading (www.weddingideasmag.com)
  3. ^ Wedding Ideas Facebook page (www.facebook.com)
  4. ^ @wimagazine Twitter account (twitter.com)

A Valentine’s Proposal: How to Make a Declaration of Love

With Valentine’s Day 2019 nearly upon us, there’s no better time for brides-to-be to make a declaration of love. Here’s how to write your fiancé the best Valentine’s speech yet…

A Valentines Proposal: Nothing Says I Love You Like... Couple saying I love you

A Valentine’s Proposal: How to Make a Declaration of Love

In past years, a trip to the Odeon, followed up with some dough balls at Pizza Express might have done the trick, but this one needs to count. If you’ll excuse our making some assumptions, it’s likely you’re a bride-to-be reading this article, and that your fiancé proposed[1] to you in a way that really put his heart on his sleeve. He left himself vulnerable and exposed. Not literally.

So how about using Valentines Day to return the favour? To say that loving something you never had the chance to prepare and to show him that he doesn’t have exclusive rights to bold, romantic gestures.

The one tip we would give any wannabe speech giver, is to be relevant. So what does relevance mean when you want to tell him you love him? It means saying it in a way that will mean something to him, because it’s in a language he understands. It is personal. So here are a few ideas to spark your Valentine’s declaration and get you writing. Just pick the character that sounds most like your husband, and start from there!

The Football Fan

A Valentines Proposal: Nothing Says I Love You Like... football table

First things first, get your timing right. Switching off the Arsenal match at 60 minutes to pour him a glass of champagne and declare your undying love would simply demonstrate a lack of true understanding.

So ensure his mind isn’t elsewhere and tell him that you think you understand the way a true football fan feels leaving the stadium, feeling elated after their team has won a fabulous match. There’s a sense of excitement, a feeling of belonging, and a real belief that there are great times to come. And that’s the way you feel about him.

If that’s not enough, you could get really clever and ‘throw-in’ a pun or two to ‘substitute’ pure emotion for a funnier ‘point or three’.

The Bookworm

A Valentines Proposal: Nothing Says I Love You Like... book stack

You could writing a romantic novella in which you and your man live happily every after. But failing that, why not keep it simple? One option would be to take one of his favourite novels (ideally a love story), and use it to show your true feelings. Perhaps you found it boring the first time you read the book[2]. You didn’t get it. Maybe the romance felt over the top, and the lengths to which the protagonists went to be together were simply hard to believe. Tell him that you were wrong. That you couldn’t relate with Gatsby, or Anna Karenina, or Mr Darcy, Cathy, or Jane Eyre, because you’d never felt what they had. Until now.

Of course, best to make sure you’ve both read the novel in question (if you haven’t, do some research so you can blag it convincingly)! If you can find a quote that captures how you feel, all the better.

The Techie

A Valentines Proposal: Nothing Says I Love You Like... computer code

Chances are you’re saving the new soldering kit for his next birthday. In which case, let’s stick with words. As with the above examples, the key is to speak in a language he would best understand. In this case, why not Javascript? C++? PERL? If those mean nothing to you, don’t worry: they mean nothing to us either. And if you don’t fancy learning to code before the 14th, there is another viable option: English.

If you want to stick to a card, you might consider saying that your heart has been hacked, the code of love has been cracked (you get the idea), and sign it ‘Anonymous’. Please don’t refer to ‘compatibility issues’ which may scare him despite working perfectly on paper.

The Film Buff

A Valentines Proposal: Nothing Says I Love You Like... Cinema

Short of nicking a romantic monologue from one of his favourite movies[3] , the next best option would be take a classic love story and update it to your lives. Let’s take Casablance, for example. For Isla, the impossible choice she faces is between the man she loves (Rick), and the cause she believes in (Lazlo).

Why not tell your fiance how lucky you feel when you watch Casablanca, because to you, he is both Rick and Lazlo. Or that to when you watch Bridget Jones, you realise he is both Hugh Grant and Colin Firth. Both Rhett and Ashley to your Scarlett O’Hara. Both Mrs Robinson and daughter to your Dustin Hoffman. You get the gist. The possibilities are endless!

The Foodie

A Valentines Proposal: Nothing Says I Love You Like... steak

He might turn his nose up at a suggestion to eat at Pizza Express, but a well-worded, food[4]-centric declaration of love is a sure-fire way to impress. Depending on what really gets his mouth watering (food-wise, that is), you could prepare a few words that take one of your favourite, and season it with a sprinkling of romance. Maybe he is like the perfect steak: tender, rare, well-aged, lean, and well hung.

Alternatively, you could concoct a recipe for ‘the perfect man’, using a list of his unique qualities as an ingredient list, and his life story as preparation instructions: cook in Northampton for 18 years, before removing and letting sit in Newcastle for 3 years. Place in London for another 7 years, until perfect, contented, and engaged[5]!

Final Thoughts

There is no golden rule for romantic declarations of love, but if you’ve taken away one thing from this article, it’s the importance of relevance. Of finding that unique perspective, that unorthodox, completely personal approach that will show how much you love him. Not the idea of loving him. Not the idea of romance itself, but him. For all his quirks, flaws, and idiosyncrasies. It’s so easy to say I love you, but rarely easy to explain why. If you can, however, he will never, ever forget it.

What next?

Hopefully this gets Valentine’s Day off to a good start. But there is a more auspicious opportunity to come. A day when you can say all this in full – and let your friends and family hear what you feel. Yes, you can become part of an ever-growing bunch of brides[6] who speak at their wedding. They key there isn’t just to be relevant, but original too. To say something that your guests will never have heard before, and that is totally different from what the other speakers will cover on the day.

Words by: Laura Bolshaw

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Want more wedding information and inspiration? Just hit ‘Like’ on our Wedding Ideas Facebook page, and ‘Follow’ on our @wimagazine Twitter account. To join in the conversation, share your stories here.[7][8][9]

References

  1. ^ proposed (www.weddingideasmag.com)
  2. ^ book (www.weddingideasmag.com)
  3. ^ movies (www.weddingideasmag.com)
  4. ^ food (www.weddingideasmag.com)
  5. ^ engaged (www.weddingideasmag.com)
  6. ^ brides (www.weddingideasmag.com)
  7. ^ Wedding Ideas Facebook page (www.facebook.com)
  8. ^ @wimagazine Twitter account. (twitter.com)
  9. ^ here (www.facebook.com)

Who Does Wedding Speeches From the Bridal Party?

Traditionally, speeches have always been made by the father of the bride, the groom and the best man. Three blokes and only one of them was meant to be funny. The traditional etiquette can work a treat an may be a great fit for your wedding. However, if you’re keen to give more of the women a voice, then we’re here to tell you who does wedding speeches from the bridal party.

bride-wedding-speech-Who Does Wedding Speeches From the Bridal Party? Credit: chrisbarberphotography.co.uk

Who Does Wedding Speeches From the Bridal Party?

The Bride

It’s fair enough if you’d prefer to sit back, quaff the fizz and take in all the compliments. However, if you’re feeling more vocal then there are no rules against you getting up and sharing some choice words. Guests tend to love it as it’s often unexpected. If your wedding is a fairly big gig then it’s also a great way to share your thanks with everyone, in case you don’t make it round them all.

However, if you can’t tackle the nerves to give a solo speech, consider giving a joint Mr & Mrs speech. Your groom might jump at the chance of taking the pressure off him.

The Mothers

Maybe your dad isn’t around or maybe you just think your mum would love the opportunity to get a word in. We also find the mother of the groom generally has a lot to say so consider all options. Whether it’s the mums or the dads, reassure them that their speech doesn’t need to be long.

mother of the bride speech

The old or the Young

It’s lovely to have a quirky speaker in the line-up, someone who has absolutely no etiquette to follow. We heard a great speech by an 89-year-old grandpa; there were no formalities, no toast but a few good anecdotes and a great sense of love and affection. Another idea is considering a younger speaker to do a short reading.

Maid of Honour

Already very popular in America, we’re now seeing more maid of honour speeches over here too. Some are sweet and some much funnier than the best man’s effort. We’ve all seen the film Bridesmaids (if you haven’t we need to talk) which provides a lesson in how not to give a Maid of Honour speech. Encourage funny, punchy and touching speeches only.

bridesmaids movie speech

Everyone

You may want to opt for no formal speeches but welcome anyone to raise a toast to you. This takes the pressure off the traditional speakers. It can also help solve some of the moral crisis that can result from complicated family set-ups. Be warned though, by the time the table wine has been drunk, there may be a lot of people wanting to get involved.

Speaking to the Speakers

Finally, once you’ve decided who you’d like to give a speech it’s time to let everyone know. We wouldn’t recommend ‘dropping’ a traditional speaker unless you know they’d appreciate being let off the hook but encouraging them to keep it short and sweet is perfectly acceptable.

bride receiving speech - who does wedding speeches

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Want more wedding information and inspiration? Just hit ‘Like’ on our Wedding Ideas Facebook page, and ‘Follow’ on our @wimagazine Twitter account. To join in the conversation, share your stories here.[1][2][3]

References

  1. ^ Wedding Ideas Facebook page (www.facebook.com)
  2. ^ @wimagazine Twitter account. (twitter.com)
  3. ^ here (www.facebook.com)

4 of the Best Wedding Speeches Ever

Whether you’re a groom, best man or father of the bride, here’s four of the best wedding speeches ever to provide you with some wedding speech inspiration and examples of the best wedding speeches..

4 of the Best Wedding Speeches Ever

4 of the Best Wedding Speeches Ever

We love a good speech here at Wedding Ideas. When wedding speeches are done right, they can be the highlight of the reception. If you’re looking for some creative, unique and hilarious wedding speech inspiration, then take a look at some of our favourites below…

Groom Speech

We’ve had a special place in our hearts for singing grooms ever since we watched Tom Fletcher of McFly’s amazing tribute[1] to his wife Giovanna. However, it was his groom’s speech that got us this time and it’s just as inventive!

Nonetheless, we’re not sure the mother of the groom appreciated the fart jokes.

READ MORE: How to write the perfect groom speech for your wedding[2]

Father of the Bride Speech

Now, this is one devoted dad. We love this amazing poem from father of the bride[3] Tom – it’s not easy to write a wedding speech that’s funny, touching and rhymes.

We recommend you put the subtitles on in this video to truly appreciate his wonderful words.

Our favourite moments are Tom’s beautiful dedication to his wife and the mother of the bride. You can find this around five minutes in, and his general advice for newlywed couples at the nine-minute mark.

Best man Speech

There’s nothing better than a funny best man[4]‘s speech, and this is one of our favourites.

The typical one-liners about marriage have everyone cracking up but it’s the twist we love. The best man had a huge cardboard cut-out of the groom in a costume made up. Plus, we bet it made for a great photo opportunity later too.

Maid of Honour Speech

Who said only men should give wedding speeches at receptions? This amazing rap by the bride’s sister just goes to show that us girls can rock it.

We love that she still managed to get a bit of good life advice in at the end too. Plus everyone clearly loved it – a truly brilliant wedding speech.

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Want more wedding information and inspiration? Just hit ‘Like’ on our Wedding Ideas Facebook page, and ‘Follow’ on our @wimagazine Twitter account. To join in the conversation, share your stories here.[5][6][7]

References

  1. ^ Watch Tom's speech on Youtube (www.youtube.com)
  2. ^ READ MORE: How to write the perfect groom speech for your wedding (www.weddingideasmag.com)
  3. ^ father of the bride (www.weddingideasmag.com)
  4. ^ best man (www.weddingideasmag.com)
  5. ^ Wedding Ideas Facebook page (www.facebook.com)
  6. ^ @wimagazine Twitter account. (twitter.com)
  7. ^ here (www.facebook.com)

5 Real Speeches to Make Your Guests Laugh

Ready to raise your glass to word-perfect wedding speeches? Do you want the whole room to be roaring with laughter or holding back happy tears? One thing’s for certain: you don’t want your speeches to be a flop. Take inspiration from five real speeches to make your guests laugh. If these couples can nail their wedding speeches, you can do too.

Bride and groom laughing 5 Real Wedding Speeches to Make Your Guests Laugh

5 Real Speeches to Make Your Guests Laugh

Surprise songs from the best men

Even though they opted for a laid-back wedding, Alexa and Jamie were happy to have the traditional speeches too. The best men and a good friend ensured that tradition went out of the window, however, when they then became a fantastic band and sang a couple of hilarious songs about Jamie and Alexa.

Furthermore, they had only practised once or twice in the back of a van prior to the wedding. The whole party loved the thoughtful chorus.

Video messages and perfect poetry

When Sally and Martin married, the bride’s mother read a wedding-related poem, ‘He’s Not Perfect’ by Bob Marley, as a speech.

“She read it out to me in the morning while I was getting ready and had the whole party in tears. I asked her to read it again before the speeches!”

Sally’s brother Jack couldn’t make the big day, so as a surprise he recorded Mcfly’s ‘It’s All About You’.

“A projector displayed his singing, which was accompanied by photographs of me and Martin from over the years,” remembers Sally.

“I’d managed to hold back the tears all day until this point!”

Bride’s speech

For Jaime and Blake, the speeches kicked off with Jaime’s mum and brother doing a joint speech with loving stories and childhood memories. Blake gave a heartfelt speech.

“He left no one out and really honoured me and our families,” smiles Jaime.

“I spoke last, I felt it was important to say thank you to everyone that made the day so perfect for us.

“Our wedding day also fell on the same day that we held my dad’s memorial service eight years ago, under those same flat-grown trees on the farm. It was a great way to honour his memory and bring him alive on our big day.”

laughing bride 5 Real Wedding Speeches to Make Your Guests Laughalipaul.com

Prizegivings, heartfelt words and howling laughter

A twist on tradition, Jess decided to give a short speech herself, thanking the bridesmaids, best men and her parents. In place of wedding favours this fun loving couple arranged a duck bobbing competition. Jess announced the winners and gave out the prizes during her speech, before the men the stepped in with their own.

Jess says,

“Jordy did an incredible speech that was very emotional and heartfelt, I felt so proud of him. My dad did a great job of making everyone laugh and cry and Matt,
Jordan’s best man, had the whole room howling with laughter to finish!”

Silly hats and embarrassing photos

Finally, the two best men at Natalie and Kieth’s wedding brought props along to their speech.

“The speeches were very entertaining, involving everyone in the room putting on silly hats that they had secretly brought with them. 

“There were embarrassing photos of us as children and a very emotional speech from Keith,” says Natalie.

The two best men finished with a joint speech, including funny anecdotes with lots of references to Keith’s love of useless information and random facts too.

READ MORE: 


Want more wedding information and inspiration? Just hit ‘Like’ on our Wedding Ideas Facebook page, and ‘Follow’ on our @wimagazine Twitter account. To join in the conversation, share your stories here.[1][2][3]

References

  1. ^ Wedding Ideas Facebook page (www.facebook.com)
  2. ^ @wimagazine Twitter account. (twitter.com)
  3. ^ here (www.facebook.com)

Wedding Speech Tips That’ll wow Your Guests

Giving a speech at any time can be incredibly nerve-wracking, let alone at a wedding. Wedding speeches can really take your audience on an emotional rollercoaster, especially when done right. So we’ve pulled together some wedding speech tips to help you deliver a memorable speech.

microphone wedding speech tips to wow your guests

Wedding Speech Tips

We caught up with leading speechwriter, commentator and coach, Lawrence Bernstein, who’s got some top wedding speech tips to help you get started.

The Father of the bride

Who’s you new son in law?

Although your primary purpose is to talk about your daughter in your wedding speech, don’t make the mistake of forgetting to mention your new son-in-law. Love him or loathe him, half the guests are there for him and they’ll be wanting to know how happy you are for them both.

Welcome the guests

It’s a nice gesture for the father of the bride[1] to mention those who’ve travelled far and anyone of a significant age. I.E the very old or the very young.

Keep it short

Yours is the first wedding speech so don’t let it drag on too long. Make sure it’s no more than 10 minutes (timed when speaking slowly) which on paper is about 1,000 words.

Managing the nerves

If the big moment has arrived and you’re feeling terrified, then before you start the speech, ask the people at the back of the room if they can hear you. It’s an old trick, but it allows you to get those first few words out, will get a response from the crowd, and should help you settle.

The toast

Don’t forget to take a glass with you to make a toast to the Bride and Groom.

wedding speech tips to wow your guests

The Best Man

Humour vs Sincerity:

Too many Best Men[2] write their wedding speeches with a bunch of friends over a few beers. This can be fun at the time but often results in a speech high on rude stories and innuendo but low on sincerity. Strike a balance. The audience will enjoy some jokes at the Groom’s expense but in context. This demonstrates he’s a good friend with some decent qualities.

Ask around

Ask the Groom’s parents for stories from his childhood. Also ask his siblings for their version of events from the early years, his fiancée about her first impressions of him and the stags for any memorable stories. Do this to get a good mixture of content.

It’s not all about you

It may be tempting to focus your speech on your own relationship with the Groom, but if you labour the point too heavily it can sound like narcissism. This is not your chance to boast about how close you are, how funny you find each other or how many girls you’ve both slept with.

At the same time don’t gush

If you’re the emotional type you might be tempted to use your speech to thank him publicly for everything he’s done for you. Be careful. Very few people will care and you risk appearing self-indulgent.

Don’t be put off by a heckle

The rest of your audience will want to hear what you have to say.  And most of them will be as irritated as you are by the uninvited interruption. Smile, pause and carry on.

bride wedding speech tips to wow your guests

The Bride

Timing

Some Brides want to use their speech to mark the end of the celebrations. This can be dangerous. Some guests will have left, many will be drunk and you may have missed the moment. I’d suggest speaking directly after your husband. Here you can provide a female perspective and leave it to the Best Man to finish things off.

Enlist a friend

Most wedding dresses don’t leave much room for your notes. So make sure you’ve asked a bridesmaid[3] or close friend in advance to hold onto your speech until you need it.

Consult the other speakers

Your biggest risk is covering ground that has already been mentioned in the other speeches. I would strongly recommend that however original you think your speech may be, you have a quick chat with your Groom, your Dad and the Best Man to ensure there is no overlap!

Be nice to your new family

This is not the time to offend your mother-in-law. You’ve got plenty of years ahead of you to do that. If you’re mentioning your own family, it would be courteous to include your husband’s too.

End with a Toast

I wouldn’t repeat one of the traditional toasts given by the other speakers. This is a great opportunity to include other people or say something a little bit different. You could toast your hosts (i.e. ‘Mum and Dad’) or propose a more general toast to ‘friends and family’.

groom wedding speech tips to wow your guests

The Groom

Avoid a long list of thank yous

Nothing can be more dull or unoriginal than a speech that resembles a school register of thanks. Stick to those that really need a mention.

Having said that

Don’t forget to thank your new in-laws[4] (particularly if they are hosting the wedding). Also remember to thank your own parents. This is an opportunity to thank them for all those years of help and support.

Don’t spend more time building up the Best Man over the Bride

Although it’s nice to reference the Best Man and poke a bit of fun at him, remember that your wedding day is about your relationship with your Bride, not your best mate.

Liaise with her Dad

Assuming he is speaking before you, it’s worth checking that you are not going to be duplicating too many thanks or anecdotes. Check what he is saying about your Bride, how you met, and the proposal.

She’s your ‘wife’ so feel free to mention it!

Nothing gets more of heart-warming cheer than the line “my wife and I…”. Yes it’s predicable and a little bit cheesy, but the novelty of hearing it for the first time never fails to please your new bride or your guests. And that cheer will relax a nervous speaker no end.

Lawrence has written speeches and presentations for hundreds of clients in the UK and overseas, including businessmen, politicians and hundreds of nervous Fathers-of-the Bride, Best Men and Brides. If you want more wedding speech tips from him, visit www.greatspeechwriting.co.uk[5]

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Want more wedding information and inspiration? Just hit ‘Like’ on our Wedding Ideas Facebook page[6], and ‘Follow’ on our @wimagazine Twitter account[7] to join in the conversation.